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  • “Associative spirit” the key to grassroots sport’s future Interview with Jean Camy, University of Lyon
    Do we need to introduce Jean Camy? As a well-known contributor to ISCA projects and the MOVE Congress, he is a familiar face to the grassroots sport community. But if his name doesn’t ring a bell, Prof. Jean Camy is from the University of Lyon in France and has been a sociologist observing and analysing sport activities and organisations for forty years. He is a “specialist” in human resource management in sport organisations and also has strong practical experience in governance, having chaired several French and European non-profit sport-related organisations. Carole Ponchon (EOSE PR & Project Manager and CEO of BeInnovActiv) presents his thoughts and ideas below, saying that entering into an exchange with Jean Camy is always an adventure: “You know when and where you start but it will most probably get you somewhere unexpected – a priceless pathway to reflection on the journey backwards and onwards for the sport for all sector.” Carole spoke to Jean Camy at the MOVE Congress 2013 in Barcelona, delving into the philosophy behind the “sport for all movement” as well as Camy’s recommendations for the way in which grassroots sport should be managed in the future. CP: MOVE Congresses are the beat-box of the sport for all movement. Yet what may strike us at first is the wide diversity of stakeholders. To your mind, how can we define the sport for all movement?JC: This is a valuable question for it is important to know what we are talking about. Plus, you are right; the sport for all movement embraces a very broad family of organisations coming from various backgrounds and culture. When attempting to define a movement you have the choice between two positions. You can either take the stand of the deductive approach (i.e. starting with what exists) or search for its meaning.While taking the first stand, you will soon realise that sport for all organisations are characterised by their wide diversity and their common positioning against Olympism, or at least sport for performance. Looking at ISCA’s members and their history, I can identify three main types of organisations:- the ones that came from the gymnastics tradition of the 19th century and have their roots in the opposition against modern (i.e. competitive) sport, which was seen as dangerous and elite oriented (cf Germany and Czech Republic);- others that are mainly defined by their political conception: these organisations are meant to offer a popular sport, that is to say a sport for the people (cf Italy);- for other organisations, sport is perceived as an educational tool and it is defined within the framework of culture and youth as a way to defend secularism (cf France). Under the banner of sport for all, we can observe an aggregation of traditions. These traditions all have the culture as a central point. Sport is perceived as a reference to performance only and therefore sport for all organisations tend to position themselves in opposition to what we may define as ‘sport’s lack of education’. Within the framework of the sport for all movement, it is the context which makes sense and serves as a key element. Let’s take the second stand now and try to find what “sport for all” should mean. What strikes us first is the multiplicity of definition for one single term, “sport”. We are nowadays far from the conception of sport as physical activity that is governed by a set of rules or customs and often engaged in competitively. Indeed, sport is often referred to as a physical exercise linked to positive values such as health. Therefore the central question behind the definition of sport for all is what can we do to ensure it is made accessible for as many people as possible? CP: In this context, how important is it to redefine and model the sport for all sector?JC: Modelling the sport for all movement requires first to get a clear idea of what you are speaking about. That’s why the exercise of defining the movement was a great first step. Considering the wide diversity of the organisations, it is wiser to get the central question of the access to the benefits of being physically active as the main entry point for thinking the model. Such an exercise should therefore identify tracks to follow in order to galvanise formal and informal practices, adapt rules, practice hours... well as simple as it may seem, making the practice accessible and fun! I believe the roots of sport for all are to be found at the local level and so is its future. Things need to be organised at the local level while pooling together experiences from each other, proposing and inventing adapted solutions. At the moment the organised sport movement, including sport for all organisations, is creating barriers rather than solutions. CP: What are the new needs for the management of sport for all organisations?JC: The sport for all movement should be governed through different principles. In order for all organisations to be sustainable and to ensure that the most vulnerable will not suffer, it is of utmost importance to maintain the associative spirit – as a system based on democratic logic and volunteering – alive. The DNA of the functioning of an association is indeed the involvement of its members, who are the co-producers of the association’s outcomes as opposed to having a client status. This embeds the richness of the informal which cannot be found in the mercantile sphere. In a local context, there is little doubt that the type of organisations needed (as introduced above) supports generic framework. Indeed 99% of the organisations do not have any professional staff. However, they may take opportunity and advantages of a centrally organised system operating at national and international level and which role would be to act as a facilitator and an agent gathering experiences (ie an organisation willing to be a database which serve its members and provide access to tools and ideas that will help and foster the development of a managerial approach adapted to micro structures and local environments). CP: What is the role of associations in our society?JC: I firmly believe there are different types of answers to social needs and our challenge is to define a good balance between all of these spheres for society to deliver its best. Indeed the private sphere provides answers to clients’ needs and public services offer answers to users, while associations are the expression of a citizen’s society. They represent a way of life which presupposes a commitment allowing citizens to grow as human beings. That’s the reason why I keep saying that associative management needs to be different (from the other spheres) and yet aim to the professionalization of volunteers through learning communities (i.e. associations should be altruistic and offer opportunities for networking and capitalise on the volunteers’ skills and exchanges). CP: Listening to you, it seems obvious that the challenge for sport for all (i.e. allowing as many people as possible to access the benefits of being physically active) is at the hand of citizens at a local level. What is, or should then be, the role of the central structure?JC: Don’t get me wrong; to my mind national and international actors have a major role to play. They indeed should be able to be a creative force. I beg them to find way of inverting the pyramid and put in place a bottom-up process with multiplier effects on national territories. This might not be easy, but they should find a way to question the functioning of their members and challenge them to better take into account the local dimension. The key question should therefore be “how to serve the local level best” and not the contrary! This would imply a thorough reflection on the governance of these organisations to ensure a renewed understanding of local needs. As a conclusion, I would like to emphasise this simple fact. The key element for the functioning of an association is SHARING. In my opinion, a relevant way to measure the effectiveness of a professional working in a non-for-profit organisation should be his/her capacity to attract new volunteers and not to replace them. That is the reason why I say that a professional working in a sport association needs to be more than a manager, he/she has to understand and share the moral contract that gathers the association’s members together.
    “Associative spirit” the key to grassroots sport’s future Interview with Jean Camy, University of Lyon
  • Spolint in Slovenia looks at its own Changes, Opportunties and Innovations after the MOVE Congress
    October and November have been intense months for the Institute Spolint (www.spolint.org). In the spirit of opportunities, innovation and changes affirmed at the MOVE Congress, the Institute has been engaged in many activities under its programme “Sportikus” (www.sportikus.org), a multi-measure platform aimed at promoting social inclusion in/through sport. Opportunities As Slovenian coordinator of the European campaign “FARE Action Weeks”,Spolint has organised and supported many events all over the country with the support ofFARE (Football Against Racism Europe - www.farenet.org). It has been a great opportunity to establish new partnerships and to consolidate existing ones with relevant stakeholders in the Slovenian framework (official bodies of the Italian minority, the public agency “Sport Ljubljana”, schools, youth centres, sport clubs, the Partizan Skofja Loka, the Sports Union of Slovenia, diplomatic missions, media, academy, public bodies and others). The Institute has organised two workshops in the high schools of the Italian minority (topic: sport, social inclusion, human rights), two workshops targeted at football supporters (topic: sport and anti-racism) in the “House of Sport” of Ljubljana, the FAIR PLAY DAY, a round-table with representatives of the Italian Minority (topic: sport and intercultural dialogue) and a fair play protocol before the international youth hockey tournament “Zmajcek”, organised by the Hockey Club Olimpija Ljubljana. All the activities have been coordinated by Antonio Saccone, an Italian trainer currently working in Slovenia thanks to a Grundtvig grant. The EU can therefore also offer meaningful opportunities to promote change and innovation in the sport and physical activity sector. Innovation Looking at our complex society, every successful policy needs to be based on cross-sector collaboration. Accordingly, the Institute has consolidated its cross-sector network of partners, including representatives of minority groups. The FAIR PLAY DAY demonstrates this in particular: over 60 children with and without disabilities met to train and play different sports (football, volleyball, karate, gymnastics, table tennis). Darko Duric (Slovenian Paralympic Champion in swimming) and Teoman Alibegovic (former basketball player; 990 points with the Slovenian national team) joined the event to motivate children, teachers, coaches, parents and leaders to keep on being involved in sport. The project has been implemented in collaboration with Sports Union of Slovenia, Partizan Skofja Loka and the school Janela Janezica, which are already co-working in the framework of MOVE. The collaboration, which engaged two ISCA members, has been positive. Changes If we want to engage 100 million more EU citizens in sport and physical activity by 2020, we have to make the sport environment more inclusive and tolerant. Sport, games and physical activity are great cost-effective tools to improve people's life in many ways: health, socialisation, education, participation and leisure are just few examples. But firstly it is necessary to make the sport environment more inclusive and respectful. Therefore, any activity oriented towards fostering education in/through sport looks relevant indeed. Opportunities, innovations, changes: these are not just simple attractive words, they are the way forward. Spolint is trying to MOVE on. Come with us. By Antonio Saccone antonio.saccone@spolint.org FURTHER INFORMATIONwww.spolint.org/fare-action-week-2013www.flickr.com/photos/106592673@N05/Spolint, Inštitut za razvoj športa, ┼Żabnica 82c, 1357-SI Notranje Gorice E: info@spolint.org,
    Spolint in Slovenia looks at its own Changes, Opportunties and Innovations after the MOVE Congress
  • Making the most of opportunities: Harnessing the potential of youth – and the MOVE Congress
    Young people comprise one of the most engaged groups in grassroots sport. At the same time, they are some of the most underestimated contributors to grassroots sport organisations. John Downes and James Gregory from StreetGames in the UK and Laska Nenova from WOW SPORT in Bulgaria are three people who believe that giving young people more opportunities to make decisions, take responsibility and feel a sense of ownership when they’re working in grassroots sports organisations and clubs will not only keep them engaged, but could inspire them to become social entrepreneurs. That was their shared message at the MOVE Congress 2013. “Stop believing young people are only good at distributing flyers!” Nenova told participants at the ‘Grassroots sports organisations and young entrepreneurs’ workshop, presenting one example of how youthful energy and dedication is often misconceived and misused by organisations. Downes also presented a ladder model showing how organisations tend to use young contributors – who are often volunteers – from (at the negative end of the scale) manipulating them and using them as “decorations”, to consulting them for feedback and input, to involving them in directing activities and making decisions at the top level. Finding a comfortable and valued place on this figurative ladder, and knowing that they have the mobility to climb it, gives young people a clear pathway that they can use to develop entrepreneurial skills, he said. Adopting strategies to harness the potential of youth requires a careful balance to ensure that both the organisation and the young person get the most of the young person’s willingness to get involved and help out. Sometimes this means assigning roles and responsibilities; at other times it is simply a matter of letting them decide how they want to contribute. Gregory and Nenova agreed that flexibility is key, and that allowing young people to experiment and learn from their mistakes is an important way to keep them motivated. What it ultimately comes down to, according to Gregory, is creating an environment that values and empowers youth in grassroots sport and combines the “Right place, right style and right people”. In fact, this is a great recipe to get anyone active, he said. There’s always room for more ideas to get people active – MOVE Congress inspires youth expertsISCA member StreetGames was represented by three speakers to the MOVE Congress 2013, Gregory, Downes and Kerry McDonald, who presented in the ‘Engaging socially disadvantaged groups in sport and physical activity’ parallel session. While Gregory and Downes spoke about the strategies they used to keep young people active in grassroots sport, they also said they looked to the MOVE Congress for new ideas and inspiration. “I’m expecting some really good examples of great practice,” Gregory said. “[For example], how it’s easy to get people to move and how people can overcome challenges to make more people move as well. So I’m ready to take it back to the UK and make people move more.” Downes was excited to spread the word about StreetGames’ Doorstep Sport Clubs programme for socially disadvantaged youth aged between 14 and 25 at the MOVE Congress 2013 Open Market Fair. “Maybe there are other organisations in other countries that can join together and create a kind of ‘Doorstep Sport’ movement across Europe,” he said. “Hopefully we can add to that and bring some learning for that [from the Congress].” StreetGames aims to create 1000 Doorstep Sports Clubs as part of the UK Government and Sport England’s 2013-2017 Youth Sport Strategy - Creating a sporting habit for life. But who knows how far and wide the initiative will stretch using the MOVE Congress as a stepping stone to other markets?  Read more about StreetGames’ Doorstep Sports Clubs
    Making the most of opportunities: Harnessing the potential of youth – and the MOVE Congress
  • Post-MOVE Congress Interview Series: Veronica Reynolds, Intelligent Health (UK)
    To Intelligent Health in England, walking is not just an easy and highly accessible form of physical activity – it is a “real-life game”. Why? Because that’s what they have turned walking into for thousands of school children and regular citizens in England and abroad through their Beat the Street programme, which uses an interactive system to allow walkers to track their own miles and compete for prizes. Beat the Street started as an initiative to encourage school children to walk to school rather than taking the bus or getting a lift from their parents. The ‘Beat’ part of the name refers to the ‘beatboxes’, or sensor boxes, fixed to posts along walking routes in different neighbourhoods. To take part in the competition (as part of the Global Walk to School project), the children were given a card they could swipe on the beatboxes on their way to school, which registered their points in an online system. The students could collect points towards prizes for their schools, individual prizes and support for a charity of their choice. In 2012 and 2013, children from England, Canada, China and the US took part in Beat the Street and over 4,000 children participated in 2012 alone. This year, Intelligent Health expanded the Beat the Street concept to the broader community. They used Caversham in England as a test bed for the programme’s “Community Model” and its citizens tracked over 51,000 miles (82,000 kilometres) in three months, which was more than double the target amount, earning £6,000 for their local library and schools. Veronica Reynolds, Beat the Street’s Project Director, presented results from the community programme at the MOVE Congress in October. She shared some of the key strategies behind the programme’s success, including getting older people involved in the initiative by trained local doctors (GPs) to communicate the benefits of the programme to their patients and issue swipe cards to them.“13% of the population in the UK see their GP once a fortnight, so GPs are an important marketing tool for promoting physical activity,” Reynolds said. ISCA asked Reynolds more about the programme, its strategy of using GPs to get their citizens to engage more in sport and physical activity initiatives and its prospects for the future. Keep an eye on ISCA’s website for more on Beat the Street and the growing challenge to encourage children to walk to school. Q: You said in your MOVE Congress presentation that doctors played a key role in physical activity in your project. How did you find working with doctors in your project?A: I think with doctors, if they understand the value of physical activity and sports they’re very cooperative. But many of the doctors, especially in England, don’t really appreciate what an important role physical activity can play, not just in preventing disease, but actually in treating certain diseases. So there is a job to educate doctors still, and that’s part of an ongoing process, to make doctors aware of what it can mean, and how it can be a better intervention for their patients. Most patients would prefer to receive advice about exercise than a drug or a pill, and the more doctors appreciate this, the more they will be receptive. But there’s still some work to be done to get them to fully understand the benefits. Q: You mention educating doctors – do you provide the data that you collect to doctors as well as data from the WHO?A: It’s very much about looking at the evidence base, and the evidence around physical activity is growing all the time, especially in the last few years. So it’s not surprising that doctors who were trained 10-20 years ago aren’t aware of this. So it’s about getting the evidence base and showing them the facts. And we have good studies now across a large number of people that evidence is incontrovertible; they cannot argue with it when they see it. So part of the process is providing them with the evidence, but also explaining how simple the solution can be. Because even if the doctors know the benefits, how do they get that patient from their surgery room to go and do something? So we actually make them meet with the people who are providing activities and get them to talk to each other about how to engage their patients. Q: How do you plan to make your project sustainable?A: I think the sustainability of our project comes from lots and lots of people, huge numbers of people being able to participate and being able to demonstrate the cost benefit. The system we use collects date; it collects real time data of people walking and cycling. We can take that data and extrapolate figures that will show the cost benefit of what we’re doing and that is what will create the sustainability. Because if we can demonstrate a cost saving, then there will be more investment from health, from transport and from environment in what we’re doing. So it’s always about demonstrating the value of what you’re doing. Q: How do you make sure that the data you’re collecting is credible?A: The system is quite intelligent; it dismisses multiple swipes, so it discounts those. When you get a whole community doing it, they don’t allow each other to cheat. In the first few days there are a few people who try to drive around and within minutes there are children saying, “Well, you’re cheating – don’t.” And children are very good judges and very good referees. So that stops usually straight away. We also say to people we can tell from the time stamp the time they’ve taken, and if it’s too short we say you can’t win a prize because you’ve obviously driven. So it’s not usually a problem. Read more about Beat the Street here Read more about Beat the Street Caversham here
    Post-MOVE Congress Interview Series: Veronica Reynolds, Intelligent Health (UK)
  • MOVE Congress 2013 vision: Opportunities and innovation await in our dynamic sector
    “Innovation can be a very powerful engine for growth, but only if it follows a clear vision and mission. Innovation is not just to innovate, to create something new. You innovate because you have something to achieve.” Professor Silvano Zanusso, TechnoGym, Italy On 16 October 2013, the City of Barcelona, UBAE, Eurofitness, CESS and ISCA welcomed 276 grassroots sports organisations, industry, government and research representatives from over 40 countries to the MOVE Congress 2013. With so many stakeholders in the sector gathered in one place, the Congress was a dynamic and literally active setting to address a key question: In times of economical change, how can we find new opportunities to adapt and innovate what we are delivering in our sector? No fewer than 63 speakers led the discussions at plenary and parallel sessions and workshops featuring vibrant initiatives including projects supported by the European Union. Some even delivered their messages from the seat of an exercise bike! And the Open Market Fair offered interactive opportunities for the participants to explore each others’ projects and opportunities for new partnerships. So the MOVE Congress 2013 was innovative and it encouraged its participants to use change to find ways to create something new and exciting. But what is the vision and mission behind our desire to innovate? What we want to achieve together is clear. We want to make sure the sport and physical activity sector is a valued contributor to preventing non-communicable diseases, improving people’s physical and mental wellbeing, reducing the gap between physically active and inactive populations, and enabling all citizens to exercise their right to enjoy the benefits of a physically active lifestyle. To do this, we need to give each stakeholder in our sector and other related sectors the best chance to be part of the sport for all movement and be recognised for their contributions to it. The presenters at the MOVE Congress 2013 succeeded in bringing attention to initiatives harnessing the potential of underestimated and emerging parts of the sector, including: Socially disadvantaged groups, youth and the elderly – underestimated - “Socially disadvantaged groups are not hard to reach, they’re easy to reach.” Kerry McDonald, StreetGames, UK- “Stop believing young people are only good at distributing flyers!” Laska Nenova, WOW Sport, Bulgaria- “With the elderly population growing it is really important for them to know that there is also something for them to do.” Ingrid Peeters, OKRA-SPORT, Belgium Partnerships between non-governmental sports organisations, municipalities and the corporate sector – emerging - “Everybody knows the benefits of cross-sector partnerships, but somebody needs to coordinate and organise them and this is something we need to discover.” Lena Knorr, City of Stuttgart, Germany- “We believe that working with partners and listening to the thought leaders in grassroots sport, who are in abundance at the MOVE Congress, inspires us to better understand the importance of grassroots programs to move more people and get more people active.” Wouter Vermeulen, Coca-Cola Europe, Belgium The MOVE Congress is one way for our efforts to be noticed beyond our communities and countries. But it only comes by once a year. In the mean time, we rely on you and your organisations to continue finding ways to encourage people to be active, to connect with each other and expand the reach of your initiatives. In the words of MOVE Congress 2013 organising partner Toni Llop, President of CESS, Spain:“I would like to ask you all for just one commitment. We have introduced three key words: changes, opportunities, innovations. So I ask you, please find your opportunity to innovate and change the grassroots sport sector together.” We look forward to hearing all about your progress at the MOVE Congress 2014 in Rome! Find newly uploaded interviews, photos and presentations from the Congress here Join us at the MOVE Congress 2014 in Rome 
    MOVE Congress 2013 vision: Opportunities and innovation await in our dynamic sector
“Associative spirit” the key to grassroots sport’s future Interview with Jean Camy, University of Lyon
Do we need to introduce Jean Camy? As a well-known contributor to ISCA projects and the MOVE Congress, he is a familiar face to the grassroots sport community. But if his name doesn’t ring a bell, Prof. Jean Camy is from the University of Lyon in France and has been a sociologist observing and analysing sport activities and organisations for forty years. He is a “specialist” in human resource management in sport organisations and also has strong practical experience in governance, having chaired several French and European non-profit sport-related organisations. Carole Ponchon (EOSE PR & Project Manager and CEO of BeInnovActiv) presents his thoughts and ideas below, saying that entering into an exchange with Jean Camy is always an adventure: “You know when and where you start but it will most probably get you somewhere unexpected – a priceless pathway to reflection on the journey backwards and onwards for the sport for all sector.” Carole spoke to Jean Camy at the MOVE Congress 2013 in Barcelona, delving into the philosophy behind the “sport for all movement” as well as Camy’s recommendations for the way in which grassroots sport should be managed in the future. CP: MOVE Congresses are the beat-box of the sport for all movement. Yet what may strike us at first is the wide diversity of stakeholders. To your mind, how can we define the sport for all movement?JC: This is a valuable question for it is important to know what we are talking about. Plus, you are right; the sport for all movement embraces a very broad family of organisations coming from various backgrounds and culture. When attempting to define a movement you have the choice between two positions. You can either take the stand of the deductive approach (i.e. starting with what exists) or search for its meaning.While taking the first stand, you will soon realise that sport for all organisations are characterised by their wide diversity and their common positioning against Olympism, or at least sport for performance. Looking at ISCA’s members and their history, I can identify three main types of organisations:- the ones that came from the gymnastics tradition of the 19th century and have their roots in the opposition against modern (i.e. competitive) sport, which was seen as dangerous and elite oriented (cf Germany and Czech Republic);- others that are mainly defined by their political conception: these organisations are meant to offer a popular sport, that is to say a sport for the people (cf Italy);- for other organisations, sport is perceived as an educational tool and it is defined within the framework of culture and youth as a way to defend secularism (cf France). Under the banner of sport for all, we can observe an aggregation of traditions. These traditions all have the culture as a central point. Sport is perceived as a reference to performance only and therefore sport for all organisations tend to position themselves in opposition to what we may define as ‘sport’s lack of education’. Within the framework of the sport for all movement, it is the context which makes sense and serves as a key element. Let’s take the second stand now and try to find what “sport for all” should mean. What strikes us first is the multiplicity of definition for one single term, “sport”. We are nowadays far from the conception of sport as physical activity that is governed by a set of rules or customs and often engaged in competitively. Indeed, sport is often referred to as a physical exercise linked to positive values such as health. Therefore the central question behind the definition of sport for all is what can we do to ensure it is made accessible for as many people as possible? CP: In this context, how important is it to redefine and model the sport for all sector?JC: Modelling the sport for all movement requires first to get a clear idea of what you are speaking about. That’s why the exercise of defining the movement was a great first step. Considering the wide diversity of the organisations, it is wiser to get the central question of the access to the benefits of being physically active as the main entry point for thinking the model. Such an exercise should therefore identify tracks to follow in order to galvanise formal and informal practices, adapt rules, practice hours... well as simple as it may seem, making the practice accessible and fun! I believe the roots of sport for all are to be found at the local level and so is its future. Things need to be organised at the local level while pooling together experiences from each other, proposing and inventing adapted solutions. At the moment the organised sport movement, including sport for all organisations, is creating barriers rather than solutions. CP: What are the new needs for the management of sport for all organisations?JC: The sport for all movement should be governed through different principles. In order for all organisations to be sustainable and to ensure that the most vulnerable will not suffer, it is of utmost importance to maintain the associative spirit – as a system based on democratic logic and volunteering – alive. The DNA of the functioning of an association is indeed the involvement of its members, who are the co-producers of the association’s outcomes as opposed to having a client status. This embeds the richness of the informal which cannot be found in the mercantile sphere. In a local context, there is little doubt that the type of organisations needed (as introduced above) supports generic framework. Indeed 99% of the organisations do not have any professional staff. However, they may take opportunity and advantages of a centrally organised system operating at national and international level and which role would be to act as a facilitator and an agent gathering experiences (ie an organisation willing to be a database which serve its members and provide access to tools and ideas that will help and foster the development of a managerial approach adapted to micro structures and local environments). CP: What is the role of associations in our society?JC: I firmly believe there are different types of answers to social needs and our challenge is to define a good balance between all of these spheres for society to deliver its best. Indeed the private sphere provides answers to clients’ needs and public services offer answers to users, while associations are the expression of a citizen’s society. They represent a way of life which presupposes a commitment allowing citizens to grow as human beings. That’s the reason why I keep saying that associative management needs to be different (from the other spheres) and yet aim to the professionalization of volunteers through learning communities (i.e. associations should be altruistic and offer opportunities for networking and capitalise on the volunteers’ skills and exchanges). CP: Listening to you, it seems obvious that the challenge for sport for all (i.e. allowing as many people as possible to access the benefits of being physically active) is at the hand of citizens at a local level. What is, or should then be, the role of the central structure?JC: Don’t get me wrong; to my mind national and international actors have a major role to play. They indeed should be able to be a creative force. I beg them to find way of inverting the pyramid and put in place a bottom-up process with multiplier effects on national territories. This might not be easy, but they should find a way to question the functioning of their members and challenge them to better take into account the local dimension. The key question should therefore be “how to serve the local level best” and not the contrary! This would imply a thorough reflection on the governance of these organisations to ensure a renewed understanding of local needs. As a conclusion, I would like to emphasise this simple fact. The key element for the functioning of an association is SHARING. In my opinion, a relevant way to measure the effectiveness of a professional working in a non-for-profit organisation should be his/her capacity to attract new volunteers and not to replace them. That is the reason why I say that a professional working in a sport association needs to be more than a manager, he/she has to understand and share the moral contract that gathers the association’s members together.
 
 
 

A big thank you to all of the speakers, delegates, volunteers and officials who made the MOVE Congress 2013 a resounding success.

 

We invite you to browse through the congress highlights and conclusions, photos, videos and speakers presentations.

 

You are always welcome to contact the MOVE Congress 2013 Secretariat for further information.

 

See you in Rome!

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